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See References

  1. Barth, J. T., Alves, W. M., Ryan, T. V., Macciocchi, S. N., Rimel, R. W., Jane, J. A., Nelson, W. E. (1989). Mild head injury in sports: Neuropsychological sequelae and recovery of function. Mild head injury (Vol. 1, pp. 257–275). Levin, H. S., Eisen- berg, M.D., & Benton, A. L. (Eds.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
  2. Collins, M. W., Lovell, M. R., & McKeag, D. B. (1999). Current issues in managing sports-related concussion. JAMA, 282(24), 2283–2285.
  3. Johnson, B., Zhang, K., Hallett, M., & Slobounov, S. (2015). Functional neuroimaging of acute oculomotor deficits in concussed athletes. Brain Imaging and Behavior, 9 (3), 564–573.  doi:10.1007/s11682-014-9316-x.
  4. Kail R, Salthouse TA. Processing speed as a mental capacity. Acta Psychol (Amst) 1994;86:199–225.  [PubMed]
  5. Turken, A. U., Whitfield-Gabrieli, S., Bammer, R., Baldo, J., Dronkers, N. F., & Gabrieli, J. D. E. (2008). Cognitive processing speed and the structure of white matter pathways: convergent evidence from normal variation and lesions studies. NeuroImage, 42(2), 1032–1044. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2008.03.057
  6. Goldman-Rakic PS. Topography of cognition: parallel distributed networks in primate association cortex. Annu Rev Neurosci. 1988;11:137–156. [PubMed]
  7. Mesulam M. Brain, mind, and the evolution of connectivity. Brain Cogn. 2000;42:4–6. [PubMed]
  8. Reitan, R. M. (1992). Trail making test. Manual for administration and scoring, Reitan Neuropsychology Laboratory. Tucson, AZ.
  9. Smith, A. (1982). Symbol digit modalities test (SDMT) manual (revised) Western psychological services. Los Angeles, CA:.
  10. Nebes, R., Butters, M., Mulsant, B., Pollock, B., Zmuda, M., Houck, P., & Reynolds, C. (2000). Decreased working memory and processing speed mediate cognitive impairment in geriatric depression. Psychological Medicine, 30(3), 679-691.
  11. Shue KL, Douglas VI. Attention eficit hyperactivity disorder and the frontal lobe syndrome. Brain cogn 1992;20:104-24.
  12. Berry, E. L., Nicolson, R. I., Foster, J. K., Behrmann, M. and Sagar, H. J. 1999. Slowing of reaction time in Parkinson’s disease: The involvement of the frontal lobes. Neuropsychologia, 37(7): 787–795. [Google Scholar]
  13. Litvan I, Grafman J, Vendrell P, et al. Multiple Memory Deficits in Patients With Multiple SclerosisExploring the Working Memory System. Arch Neurol. 1988;45(6):607–610. doi:10.1001/archneur.1988.00520300025012
C3-LOGIX

C3-LOGIX

  • What is it?

    Processing speed has been said to be considered a key cognitive resource for human beings alongside working memory and attention (4). These tasks require higher-order association areas in the pre-frontal cortex, temporal and posterior parietal lobes to integrate information quickly and efficiently across multiple neuronal channels for cognitive functions to be utilized in goal-oriented actions (5-7). Because the brain is not made of singular units responsible for isolated tasks, by assessing these areas of the brain using C3 Logix, we are able to make inferences regarding other functions, such as, the planning and coordination of body and eye movements (pre-frontal cortex), spatial orientation (posterior parietal lobe), and the perception of speech and language (temporal lobe).

  • Why is it important?

    Processing speed has been said to be considered a key cognitive resource for human beings alongside working memory and attention (4). These tasks require higher-order association areas in the pre-frontal cortex, temporal and posterior parietal lobes to integrate information quickly and efficiently across multiple neuronal channels for cognitive functions to be utilized in goal-oriented actions (5-7). Because the brain is not made of singular units responsible for isolated tasks, by assessing these areas of the brain using C3 Logix, we are able to make inferences regarding other functions, such as, the planning and coordination of body and eye movements (pre-frontal cortex), spatial orientation (posterior parietal lobe), and the perception of speech and language (temporal lobe). The C3 Logix tests include tablet-based applications of standard paper and pencil tests: Trail Making A, Trail Making B, and Digit Symbol Matching, assessing psychomotor and visual processing speeds (8), simple and choice reaction time tests, assessing single stimuli reaction times as well as “choice” reaction times when choosing between two simultaneous stimuli (9), and a Standard Assessment of Cognition, assessing orientation, concentration, immediate and delayed memory. Upon completion, a compiled score is assigned to each section and can be used to detect any subtle deviations compared against normative data (1).

  • How does it work?

    The C3 Logix tests include tablet-based applications of standard paper and pencil tests: Trail Making A, Trail Making B, and Digit Symbol Matching, assessing psychomotor and visual processing speeds (8), simple and choice reaction time tests, assessing single stimuli reaction times as well as “choice” reaction times when choosing between two simultaneous stimuli (9), and a Standard Assessment of Cognition, assessing orientation, concentration, immediate and delayed memory. Upon completion, a compiled score is assigned to each section and can be used to detect any subtle deviations compared against normative data (1).

  • How does it help?

    Poor outcomes on C3 Logix tests are not definitive for the diagnosis of concussion. It does, however, give insight to the function of your overall neurocognitive state, involving major areas of the brain — areas that have been seen to be suboptimal, or compromised, in conditions such as, concussion (1-9), depression (10), ADHD (11), Parkinson’s Disease (12), Multiple Sclerosis (13) and many more.

  • References

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